Time at St. Peter’s Basilica!

Inspired by the clocks in Becky’s post #timesquare

The top of the facade of St. Peter’s Basilica has two clocks but show different time!

DSCN2248

DSCN2253
Left side clock

DSCN2252

The top of the facade of St. Peter’s Basilica has two clocks and several sculptures. The clocks were created to replace Bernini‘s bell towers which had to be torn down due to insufficient support. The left clock shows Rome time, the one of the right shows European mean time.

These clocks literally take us back in time when the Roman numbers can be seen in their older version – when 4 was written as IIII an not IV as it is today! 

Roman numeric system

Basic decimal pattern

The original pattern for Roman numerals used the symbols I, V, and X (1, 5, and 10) as simple tally marks. Each marker for 1 (I) added a unit value up to 5 (V), and was then added to (V) to make the numbers from 6 to 9

I, II, III, IIII, V, VI, VII, VIII, VIIII, X.

The numerals for 4 (IIII) and 9 (VIIII) proved problematic (among other things, they are easily confused with III and VIII), and are generally replaced with IV (one less than 5) and IX (one less than 10). This feature of Roman numerals is called subtractive notation.

Thanks for reading n going back in time with my clocks today!

Have a great weekend!

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Time at St. Peter’s Basilica!

Add yours

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: